Skip to main content

About your Search

20130822
20130830
SHOW
Book TV 11
News 8
Today 8
( more )
STATION
FBC 42
MSNBCW 39
CSPAN 35
CNBC 34
CNNW 29
CSPAN2 28
FOXNEWS 16
CNN 13
KPIX (CBS) 13
KGO (ABC) 12
MSNBC 12
ALJAZAM 10
KNTV (NBC) 8
KQED (PBS) 8
KRCB (PBS) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 366
French 3
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 369 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> sure. st. francis demonstrates well the evolution of elevated technology. and substantially damaged the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1907 or 1908, and extend it again in 1913. then a new tower was added in 1932, so there is all sorts of elevator technology you can see at the st. francis that very much represents the building history of san francisco. >> i understand there is a really old elevator still operating here. >> that is right, the elevator installed in the 1913 expansion. we can go look at that. >> let's go take a look. here we are in a spectacular st. francis lobby. here is the clock. when people say "meet me at the clock in the st. francis." let's look at that elevator. >> ok, let's do it. >> here we are in the elevator installed as part of the expansion, and this is the way it was originally installed about 100 years ago. it has a manual switch just like elevators did back then, and it runs on dc power. this was from a time before elevators ran on ac power. >> when did they switch? >> decided to switch in the 1920's, so this elevator predicts that by about 19 years. th
in professional sports often comes down to the smallest margins. british athletes are using military technology to stay ahead of the game. the british sports pursuit of marginal gains may have reached new heights. the olympic tae kwon do medalist is in a flight simulator. this facility is normally reserved for pilots of fighter jets, but the technology may prove useful in sports. >> making split-second decisions is what the sport is about. if we can use this technology to help us with our sports, i can see i have made amazing games -- gains. >> this form of technology could give him a winning edge. with a partnership -- they are developing a new training edge for fight and flight situation. costs tens ofse millions of pounds, and they are one of the best fighter jets in the world. but how is the state of technology like this helping the elite sporting performers? >> wind tunnels have been used by paralympic and scum a as this racing wheel promises to increase acceleration for wheelchair athletes. >> in some areas we are leading the world and you can see that with our international competitors,
's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," written by two economics professors. they write -- the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s. the portion of adults working is four percentage points below its peak in 2000. our question to you
frequency trading and all of the advanced technology. the nasdaq and all of the other exchanges three weeks ago pushed back on that. they said they like the idea of the rules. but they complain that many of the rules are too vague and they complained about the cost. particularly the reporting that's involved. all of the notification they have to give to sec. sros the letters said, that many of the economic and cost assumption by commission will generate greatly by analysis. they run the risk of reallocating resources and the sci and comply ins entities, including the nasdaq and again the nasdaq, nyse, bats and all of these other exchanges, saying, wit a mint, let's pull back a little bit. meantime, we've had this debacle happen today and these rules with public comments now closed. it is still in the rule making process. perhaps could be next year before there's any other update. >> all right, scott. we want to -- we want to slip in another earnings report. aeropostle out. >> reporting an eps loss of 34 cents. analysts expected a loss of 24 cents. on revenue of $450 million. they did tell u
this technology and that's the way we started. iverson rebuilt nucor as a steel minimill, using europe's latest technology. a minimill is defined as first of all we're starting from scrap. we don't start from ore. secondly, we melt it in electric furnaces. then we cast it to come out with a billet that is rolled into the rounds, the channels the smooth bars, that we supply to customers. it's really much more economical than ingot casting. technology had helped nucor lower costs. but what about the cost of labor? the lower prices of foreign steelmakers were based on lower wages. could nucor make low-priced steel with highly-paid american workers? it's not what you pay an employee that's important. it's what he produces. if he produces a great deal you can pay him a great deal. the average hourly worker in darlington, south carolina, in our steel mill had earnings last year of over $30,000 a year. we had melters who earned over $35,000, which compares reasonably with what unionized workers in the integrated mills earned last year. now, if you look at what we produce, though, that we produced last
of soccer. >> reporter: arsenal manager enjoyed his look at goal line technology, but getting it right is a serious business. a goal needs to actually be a goal. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: the english premier league had pushed hard for the introduction of goal technology since 2006. and they are the first league in the world to use it. the goal decision system is being made by hawk eye. in football a complicated process has been made very simple. >> very simple, quick, and accurate. many you are in the stadium, you will be able to see it, and so be broadcasters will see if it was or it wasn't. >> reporter: there is seven cameras at each end of the ground, 340 frames her second. so when there is a contentious decision, this vibrates. so it's an instant accurate decision. there has been some recent controversy over the technology in cricket. they held out against the technology until the 2010 world cup. but have now licensed four systems. german company gold cup will be used in next year's gold cup. it won't be used in the champion's league, but there is optimism that more nati
22. that is very serious. in the age of technology and the information age, we produce 70% of engineers. china produces 400,000 engineers. you know, this is serious stuff. we're talking about the future and our role in the future. and we need to begin to make adjustments. we need to make them quite soon. we cannot sit around and be enamored of support and entertainment and sports and glitz and glamour. i think we all get it. because we are the pinnacle nation in the world right now. have another pinnacle nation's forests. ancient egypt, greece. clinical nations. number one, no competition. going to be there forever. or so they thought. so what happened to each and every one of them? basically they became enamored with sports and entertainment and lifestyles of the rich and famous. they turned a blind eye to political corruption. they lost their moral compass and went right down the tubes. some will say that actually happened to the united states. but i think an honest assessment would demonstrate that it is already in the process of happening. the real question is can we b
, is this going to be the norm going forward? are there more acquisitions to be done in terms of technology and international? >> we are clearly going to be investing in technology. no doubt about it. now, whether it's acquisitions or our oh own capabilities, i spent monday and tuesday in our office in san bernardino, california, and we have acquired talent, the best talent in the world, the smartest in silicon valley, that i continue to be enthused. so we will invest in different ways in the area of technology. and at the same time, we're going to continue to invest in stores. we think the overlap -- having 11,000 retail stores around the world and the world's best technology -- we think produces the world's best way to serve consumers in every market, so we're going to continue to invest in both in order to serve customers with this overlap of technology and stores. >> you know, it's interesting that you mentioned -- first of all, will you take people from amazon.com? what about the talent there? >> well, we have great respect for all competitors, including amazon and other competitors. a
to the university of south florida's tampa bay technology incubator. incubators arm entrepreneurs with the resources needed for success. with a focus on life sciences, this incubator helps scientific entrepreneurs develop companies focusing on things like cancer-detection treatments and medical devices. "it's not just a location, it's more than just a building - it's the network, it's the people, it's the support, it helps them stay on track." nurturing and consulting entrepreneurs are the main goals of a business incubator, but giving them access to investors is equally vital. this was the case for sanberg, but getting in touch with her inner business woman, was also critical. "we're a bunch of neuroscientists that got together, what they primarily helped with us the most are marketing ideas, some of the slides, business plans, executive summaries and organization of that to better our package." cities like tampa, fla, that were hit hard by the recession,are embracing incubators as a way to fuel job growth. and with most incubators focusing on technology, those jobs are professional and high-payin
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
of a stock. technology is an issue here. everything is now run by computers. the markets are computerized. when computers run the show, they break down. they screw up. human beings screw up, but there are others to patch it. connell: all of these things that you brought up, and these are big issues, the fact that yesterday was not a complete mess in terms of market panic, what does that tell us? is that good news? charlie: this is a big deal. it has the average investors saying i do not want any parts in stocks. they are not investing in these great companies like apple. what makes america great are these companies that are in these big companies. connell: maybe they should be reassured? >> the average investor should not feel reassured. the markets are broken right now. they need fixing. they need fixing from a structural standpoint. when stuff runs as it is running now, trades are being done on dark pools. we know they had something to do with the listed price. we do not know exactly what is going on. the other issue is the technology. is it up to the task of running the markets? it is
to any technology based company, we're not perfect; right? we're 99.99% perfect. we're not perfect. we have problems. if we do, we maintain a fair and orderly market. that's what we did yesterday, and it's important to recognize the fact we didn't trade for several hours. if you're a traditional long investor, mom and pot institutional investor, that three hours doesn't matter. you buy in the stock for the longer period of time; right? the fact is, every single person was in the same situation. nobody was relatively advantaged or disadvantaged because the market was down. liz: i'll say that probably didn't sit well with some very sophisticated mom and pop investors who jump in and out of stocks. there's many out there. we talk about that, and more including what i asked the ceo to do, which was give me a 30-second pitch. pretend i'm twitter, not public, how do you convince twitter to go public when you have the facebook problem in the ipo a year ago, may, where that ipo was not smooth on the nasdaq, and then, of course, yesterday's flash freeze. charlie also just off the phone with bob
back into the cyclicals, so we're overweight the technology space, overweight financials. so i think the market is setting itself up for a good finish to the year. i still have some more dry powder, but i definitely want to be involved with this market. i think all of the naysayers all year long, i think, have -- are still waiting for that great entry point as we hit new record highs. >> josh, picking up anything on the floor about what traders will be looking forward to next week in order to figure out where we go from here? >> actually, kelly, you have a pretty relatively busy week in terms of economic fronts. you have durable goods. you have home prices. you have consumer confidence. you also have a lot more fed speak. william, lagarde, bullard, and i think traders are probably expecting kind of it to be relatively quiet here, depending on rates. remember, then again, that could change september, then we get the jobs report. of course, there's the fed taper or not tapering, and if they do, by how much. >> last question, ralph, you had said, okay, we get a 10% correction. it won't
people were working hard to make sure everything went back. but again, technology's complicated. these issues will happen, unfortunately, but what we have here is a resolution in terms of controls. and i think that's something probably that nasdaq and the regulators have to work on to avoid things like this happening not only in exchanges like nasdaq, but also in trading firms like in the case of knight capital. ashley: but, look, to err is human, to really screw up it takes a computer, and when you have all of this information all coming in very complex systems, part of the problem was the nasdaq couldn't push the old reboot, reset button because it was so interconnected with all the other exchanges. is this something we have to live with? >> no, we have to definitely review the technology. nasdaq has been in the electronic trading for 40 years, so obviously, i'm really surprised that the data feed was something that could be going wrong today. maybe it was a software glitch, maybe the data was corrupted, we don't know yet what happened really, and i think there's going to be t
house, they are already doing things with technology innovation. he is coming here to us -- to spotlight the kinds of things he is talking about how colleges can lower the cost and still maintain a good education. he will start here and then go to a high school in syracuse. as you mentioned, this is all part of a larger strategy based on what he calls the middle class programs. over the past several weeks he has given several speeches on different aspects of the programs. he talked about housing and of other city. he says education is the key to middle-class. are college graduate, a better class of entering the economy and making more of an income. even on top of that, he was on vacation last week, now getting back to the real grind. we're heading into september where we will look at budgets. the fiscal year ends september 30 and the temporary spending bill ends on september 30. if the president and congress cannot agree on a new spending plan, the government will shut down. i think you are also hearing him make his pitch for how we should handle the budget going forward. for the proposa
to the baltimore county information superhighway. the technology upgrade will fit students there. they will help keep schools safe. tim tooten explains. >> the county executive was a long -- among the showing of the technology. or the six schools with a new fiber-optic line. >> we are here of a certain generation. we knew what it was like not to have technology in the way we now know what. the fact that we have today is just amazing. likes -- >> they will find in many cases that faster is better. >> if kids have access to information, they need us to facilitate critical thinking around the information. >> we are talking about access. you often hear about thinking out of the box. we have blown the box wide-open. >> the county has installed hundred 60 miles of fiber-optic lines. it will help please keep a watch what is happening inside of all of the county only three school buildings. like second exit roll up to a site, hook onto the network, extreme the camera videos in the parking lot. they are able to see with the situation as before they enter. >> parents welcome the upgrade. >> any opportunit
picture doesn't usually change. >> at some point, the technology gets better, it gets more -- the nasdaq has more competition these days. >> they're the first one. they should be the ones that have it down. >> you would think. >> and no one is going back to specialists. we'll have all the politicians calling for more regulation. you know that's going to happen, even though the s.e.c. is already, some people think fairly heavily handed and we'll talk about that in the executive exchange in a second. other headline today, moodys placed the ratings of six of the largest banks in the u.s. on review. the agency is weighing the possibility of lesser government support for those institutions. we're talking about goldman sachs, jpmorgan, morgan stanley, wells fargo all under review with a possible implication for downgrade. bank of america and citigroup are being evaluated in their words with the direction uncertain -- already sort of -- >> see what is interesting there, right? the stronger the banks, the stronger banks are being downgraded because s&p says, oh, it all falls apart, they won't ge
are big technology names and name you have writtenextensively about, apples and microsofts and the googles and on and on. they were kind of frozen in time. trading was all but halted. i'm wonderg whether it affected them as well. callers interested in those stocks, is there a sense that you can't always trade them cleanly, whatever? >> i think this points out the pros and cons of technology. technology lowered the barriers for all sorts of investors to be able to trade. but it doesn't -- when it goes down, it really goes down. the ultimate hits are not going to go down like that. i think charlie is absolutely right. the sec totally failed. nasdaq needs to have a fail-safe system. they don't. they shouldn't be allowed to operate until they do. >> you know, ben stein, i do remember the days when you look at the floor of the stock stock and it's crowded with people. now it's tumbleweeds. so i'm wondering what happened? and is that the problem? have we taken the human out of it and made it so high-tech that it's high problem? >> the only way this would happen if there was the open crisis on li
to sell them technology. he wants the reactors back home back working and to build more. it's a economic necessity. >> they're building many new nuclear power plants and trying to export the technology. but it's inferior to japanese technology. >> reporter: japan can market itself as learning from its mistakes, but abe said the discovery of new radiation leaks will turn many japanese against nuclear power again. >> they're leaking like sievs, if you like, and people are rethinking their rethought positions. public opinion is really, really fragile 1234 but the japanese economy is fragile, too. fossil fuel imported to replace nuclear power is costing japan $40 billion a year. japanese will have to decide which is more expensive. fixes the nuclear energy or living without it. al jazeera, tokyo. >> new mexico's most populous county issuing same-sex marriage licenses. after the state district court rules it constitutional. find out why the legal battle for marriage equality in new mexico is just beginning. >>> it's just one of the ancient pieces of art that is porcelain. it can be yours for
50% in the last decade. >> my newspaper is going to take a cue from cutting edge technology such as radio and reality television by using product placement. now let's see how scoop bezos reports the international news. russian president putin today affirmed his support for the syrian government. nice word bezos. you just missed a huge revenue stream. russian president putin today affirmed his support for syria's government while enjoying a ice cold moxie soda. which it turns out is not disgusting. that taste. >> john: no serious news outlet would ever engage in that kind of shameless beverage. >> have you never seen the opening sequence of morning joe brewed by starbucks. >> john: i do think my point about serious news outlets stands. this is all window dressing, hodgeman. are you going to offer the readers anything substantively new in terms of actual content? >> of course. exclusive premium content. for those selective readers willing to pay an extra fee i will also send an actual human being the a place where news is happening. and that person will look around and ask que
need to stay on this course of putting through these technology-grounded efficiency rules for a whole range of appliances and the like. in fact, on analogies point i would raise a 2001 report from the national academy of sciences that exams d. o. e. fossil and energy efficiency port portfolio in the first twenty years. and concluded that the 22 programs the analyzed which cost about $13 billion total between '78 and 2001 yield the economic benefits of about $40 billion. so a return on investment. i think but an interesting part of the story is the study attributed -- to three efficiency programs that cost $11 million. even relatively small efficiency programs can yield results both in economic benefit and reduction of carbon emission. regoing to be strongly focused on advancing this energy efficiency agenda in multiple do main and certainly our responsibility with rulemaking i will assure you we will maintain strong pressure in this direction. another key provision of the president's climate plan districts epa to issue rules for cutting carbon emissions for new and existing power plan
♪ >> the hottest tech trend out there perhaps is the cloud, a truly disruptive technology that is crushing traditional hardware based tech firms as well as old fashioned software firms that can't compete in a crowd computing world. lately, we heard it has gone 's synonymous with this theme, that is salesforce.com, crm for you home gamers. the service provides businesses with applications they need to manage sales, services, marketing, customer relations and much more. this stock is giving you a 667 gain since the visionary ceo came back on november, 28, right in the midst of the financial crisis, he told us everything would be okay. they reported a 2% earning fee off a 7% basis. revenues came in higher than anticipated. referred revenue up and the company raised its revenue begins for 2013 4 billion or more. the co-founder chairman, ceo, salesforce.com, find out more about the quarter and its prospects, mr. benya. thanks for coming on the show. >> thank you for having me. >> we see accelerating growth, accelerating your go ahead, too, all the way up to $4 billion. what happened this quarte
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
, and they are reinventing themselves. think ever not just innovation and technology, but look at the lining around the city, shake shack? i mean, that's innovative burger, and people wait an hour to get one. adam: it's greasy though. >> it's good enough to wait an hour in line, but there's forms of innovation, and in the trucking industry -- lori: despite worker regulations on the hours they drive? >> doesn't help, but they have to work around that stuff, and that makes them -- at the end of the day, more competitive. adam: sensing a takeover? >> glad you said that. they have been in the rumor mill on and off for a long time, and hammered in part because of poor excuse, oversold despite the fact it's coming back. feel like they are chasing breakouts, and the new ceo is a woman, i think, the first woman to run the company in a long time. womenning the -- woman of a trucking company. innovation; right? these old-schoolboys from ors, okay, thinking out of the box. i like it. earnings estimates for the fiscal year this year and next year rocket to the upside. wall street expects big things from the company and
the importance of technology. and we cannot forget what the nasdaq has become. going to a controlled company to a publicly traded nasdaq. dennis: let's go back. >> i like this hillary. i really like her. dennis: when something like this goes wrong, which would you prefer as a guy in the business, that the ceo of the nasdaq comes out right away and says we are looking into it. right now i don't know anything. he sta on tv and is talking all day. or would you prefer other silence and then at the end of the day they come out with some incomprehensible statement? >> of course that technology in getting that back up and going is great. from the standpoint of communication, you have to communicate because people will naturally get fearful without knowledge. people will start doing things they should not do. absolutely shouldave had better communication. dennis: hillary. >> just remember -- dennis: i have a question. my questions are far more important than your answers. [laughter] but it occurs to me, everyone saying this will further undermine confidence among small investors. really couldn't you
mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cover poverty, to cover race, to go deeper and find the real story. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we would rather be here. >> will be on line. >> look at it and see the people that came to the march. these are ordinary men and women dressed like they are going to church and they believe they are going to church. >> i think that the world came together around an idea that all men, and we soon added women and children, gay lesbian and children are created equal so it cr
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. i'm, like, totally not down with change. but i had to change to bounce dryer bars. one bar freshens more loads than these two bottles. i am so gonna tell everyone. [ male announcer ] how do you get your bounce? [ woman ] time for change! >> 23 minutes past the hour. hello, everybody. this is your fox news minute. the giant wildfire near yosemite national park grew by several hundred acres overnight, but that is a relatively small increase compared to recent days. it has burned more than 300 acres and containment only at 30%. the obama administration is announcing two new steps on gun control which will not require congressional approval. it will curb the impact of surplus weapons. the ministration proposing a closer loophole allowing certain weapons reregistered to corporations without background checks. gun legislation collapsed in congress earlier this year. good news for some runners, in the field at the boston marathon will be larger ne
, number one, all affordable things. >> we looked at technology, affordable and some fun stuff for summer. we're starting with a green wall here. it's magnetic, so these come right off, easy to plant on the side and hang them up in your home. >> don't let it fall. >> great as a feature wall great to plant herbs in. >> great for herbs. >> beautiful succulents right here. >> i love when you talk like that. say that again. >> mint, rosemary. anything you use in the kitchen. >> and it's inexpensive? >> yes, it is. >> something like this, you're talking $75. very affordable. >> but then you have to buy the plants. >> exactly. come on, look at these beautiful photos. >> i know these two ladies. >> look at blakey. >> this is a company called canvas pop. i've been using them personally for years. they used to only do huge photos. now these -- and i know these are all instagram photos. the problem with instagram, they are low resolution. canvas pop has a technology called picture perfect. it gets rid of the pixels, but as a user, you don't need to know about the tech or understand it. you upload t
twice that. that is according to s&p capital iq. >> that prize itself on being a technology vanguard. if they have these hiccups how well are they serving their clients in the future. >> rennance capitol tells us that the new york stock exchange was gaining ground before facebooks ipo but that nasdaq fumbled one of the most popular ipo's ever. it gave the new york stock exchange ammunition. today's pitching will likely do the same. the exchange says the lead is likely accelerating. it has raised four times more capital than any other marketplace with a record. now of course all eyes are on what twitter, dropbox, and other technology and uber will choose and which exchange they will choose when they go public in the next year. >> thank you very much. and in today's question of the day, we asked after yesterday's shut down, what are you thinking today. the sec needs tighter regulation. 59% says the nasdaq needs to get it together. that is interesting. 15% say this makes me less likely to trade all together. >> that is a tough one. several big name emerging markets. the impact on the do
storm. he preserved the technology to get started up all over again. when we took down sadaam, we shut down the iraqi nuclear threat. when we shut down the iraqi nuclear threat, muammar gaddafi surrender all of his stuff. he had centrifuges, he had a weapons design, a chinese nuclear weapons design, all that stuff now resides in the united states. gaddafi did not want to have happen to him what happened to saddam hussein. when we went after gaddafi, we went after khan. he went into the black market operation himself and was selling nuclear weapons technology to the libyans. they were his best customer. to the iraqis, north koreans, and we shut down khan's black market operation. we took out three major sources of proliferation. that in and of itself is reason enough for what we did to saddam hussein in iraq. the threat has not gone away. you may remember it was discovered in the spring of 2007 that a few months after north korea set off their first nuclear test that the north koreans had built a nuclear reactor a couple of producing plutonium in the eastern syrian desert. syria's a mes
the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >> well, i think to be honest, russian and chinese, these are authoritarian governments. this is a client state. they are worried about, the only thing chinese care about is continuing access to oil supplies out of the region. syria is not much importance to any of us in terms of national security. i think they are symbolic. they will halt legitimacy through the u.n. they won't oppose us on the ground. the question will be, if we pull off this strike with 200 tomahawks some time this weekend, what's the likely outcome? it is unpredictable. unlikely to be good. you want to use military power and tell the u.s. air force and navy, you've got 60 days to bring down the assad regime, they'll do it. there's no question. then we will live with the follow-on war in which they try and eliminate the christians, the -- et cetera. >> thank you for your thoughts today. >> thank you. >> bill, not a lot of good options f
other than the 8 talked about synergies but we get this with people with the technology and fletcher is contemplating a fairly significant cuts once the merger gets close. i believe it is closed at the beginning of the third quarter, sometime in the fall we should point out. it is interesting, quick to somebody the stock exchange has, quote, 20 lawyers doing the same thing. when you have that type of overlap, he thinks there is a lot of fat to be trimmed from the stock exchange. the new york stock exchange will tell you they need a lot of overhead. this is a different animal than the police which is the computerized trading mechanism which focuses on options and the stock exchange and other things get a listing, gets companies to list on the stock exchange marketing and advertising that goes along with that which means more head count. it will meet in new middle. from what i understand there's not a lot of middle ground here. they have been running the show from what i understand and basically the new york stock exchange for better or worse is being managed, they do not have much say
today. specific program managers are afraid of applying l.e.d. technology because in the short-term it costs more and they are evaluated specifically on a one-year timeframe for money even though the system can't cut a lifetime system that l.e.d. lights will save thousands of hours in replacement costs. that is not -- they stick with legacy systems. if you were to spend money right now it would save you money in the long runs. >> to piggyback on that i come from industry and even an industry innovation takes a long time to end up with the widgets in the gadgets. let's look at cars. cell phones have been ubiquitous in people's hands for a long time. finally in 2014 models are starting to everett ties the cell phone holder next to the cupholder. that is not even technological and evasion. it's just someone that says i'm designing a car and i will just kind of peace over that okay so this is industry. this is a buildup industry from detroit that says what is competing with the best of the best so it's just a mindset or look at tablets. tablets have been ubiquitous for a long time
said it, it's all this technology coming together. it's high-speed trades, rapid fire in, and the system -- >> just to step in, i know you're going there to blame high frequency trading as the problem here, but that wasn't the situation. >> no, no, i'm saying let's put it all together and look at market structure. we have a problem with market structure in this country. we don't need 90 venues to trade spots because they don't trade like retail. >> i agree with that point. the point is we ever the system that the securities exchange commission wanted to have. they have to dismantle the nyse and the nasdaq monopoly, they wanted to open up competition, they wanted new exchanges to come in, they wanted to trade in pennies. this technology did come about and offer high frequency trading, but we have the system that they wanted now, and i agree with your point. it is needlessly complicated. >> sorry, i think the system is working very well. there is a problem somewhere. while they work on that problem, they shut the trades down so nobody has a disadvantage across all platforms
technological edge, if we're not upgrading our roads and our bridges and our transportation systems and our infrastructure, all things that we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right now, if we don't do those things, then 20 years from now, 30 years from now, we will have fallen further and further behind. so when we get back to washington, when congress gets back to washington, this is going to be a major debate. it's the same debate we've been having for the last two years. the difference is now, deficits are already coming down. what we should really be thinking about is how do we grow an economy so that we're creating a growing, thriving middle class and we're creating more ladders of opportunity for people willing to work hard to get in the middle class. and my position is going to be that we can have a budget that is sensible, that doesn't spend on programs that don't work, but does spend wisely on those things that are going to help ordinary people succeed. all right. good. let's see, it is a gentleman's turn. this gentleman right h
there's a whole world people are fascinated in. entrepreneurship, technology, and someone needs to demystify it for everyone else. so "dot-complicated" take a look at the tech-obsessed world we live in and how it's changing our career and lives and our families. >> how do you do that? >> it's interesting but i talk a lot about finding tech life balance. there's been a lot of talk on work life balance, but if you go home from work and still buried in the cell phone, if you're sitting on your laptop next to your husband at home. you are still working. you haven't really found that work life balance. so i talk lot about how to find tech life balance in your home, if your job, in your love life, and kind of all area of communication. >> are you saying turn off the excise -- device and go off facebook? >> i think there's a time and place for everybody. i think if you take a little bit of time to unplug to remember there's a world when you look up from your screen you can enjoy it. it makes you all the more productive, refreshed, relaxed when you return to that online world, also. >>
-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." you can follow me on facebook and @ed show, all that good stuff in the social media. we love hearing from viewers. tonight in our ask ed live segment, the question comes from cordel garrett, do you think some on the right are itching for a race war in this country? god for bid. talk about transparency. our producers put that question up. i think we in the media have a responsibility to tone things down when it gets hot. if you know what i mean. no, i don't think there's going to be a race war in america. and i don't think there are some when you say some on the right, i mean, three, four, ten, thousands, whatever? i'm trying to answer this as directly as i can. i don't think there's going to be a race war in america nor would i ever advocate that. but i think that conservatives will do just a
's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ ♪ kneel kneeling fifty years later, what have we learned? i'm not talking about racism, i think and hope we made progress there, but government smending, under the guides of helping people, little progress there because the war on poverty, hate to break it to youings we're losing, my friend. a year after martin luther king spoke on the steps of the lincoln memorial, waste upon waste warrants its own memorial that should read "in memory of taxpayer
, tennis has gotten a lot less dainty, rackets less splintery, courts more surfacey. technology made the game a whole lot faster and awesomer. it's kind of like how esurance used technology to build a car insurance company for the modern world. advantage, you. let's give it up for the modern world. [ crowd cheering ] [ male announcer ] or...that works. esurance. proud sponsor of the u.s. open. check out esurance on facebook. >>> make this moment count. don't simply commemorate, agitate. don't only memorialize, mobilize. take this spirit, take this spirit back to your communities, your neighborhoods, your schools, take this spirit back and keep it alive. >> that was lee saunders, heads of the afscme labor union. we attend the same schools, we work, eat, and play together. our nation's first african-american president was elected and re-elected by the broadest coalition of american voters in our history. and yet while we've made great strides, disparities remain, and there's some very real institutional barriers to success for too many people. as we saw on the stage today, the movement
dugan, technologist at the open technology institute in d.c. and i started by asking bryan about the government's claim that it is not fully aware of the extent of edward snowden's leaks. >> it is incredibly disturbing that they do not know what was taken, no audit trail was created. that is the type of abrogation of trust that the united states government needs to restore and that is why the president of the united states needs to instate an independent, external council of experts to review the nsa spying. on all these systems that edward snowden was using, they, by default, should be creating audit trails of every single action of every single administrator on the machine. edward snowden was not the top- level administrator of this machine. he happened to have access across domains at a top-secret security level. there is no excuse for any administrator to not keep logs of that type of information, and it is entirely disturbing and untrustworthy of the nsa to not keep track of that type of intermission -- information. >> or they are being less than truthful as we have seen or
concerns that people have that technology is moving so quick that at 1078 point does the technology outpace the laws that are in place and the protections that are in place and do some of these systems end up being a loaded gun out there that somebody at some future point could abuse? because there are no allegations and i am very confident knowing the nsa and how they operate is purposely somebody is out there trying to abuse the program or listen in on people's phone calls. >> you're confident in that in. >> i am confident in that. but what i recognize is that we're going to have to continue to improve the safeguards and as technology moves forward, that means that we may be able to build technologies to give people more assurance and we do have to do a better job of giving people confidence in thou these programs work. so what i've said is that i am open to working with congress to figure out can we get more transparency in how to oversight court works, do we need a public advocate in there who people have confidence in. but we have to do it in a way that recognizes that we've got some h
technologically-driven our economy is, especially these high speed trades and, you know, smart grid, et cetera, the more vulnerable are we to potential interruptions. >> now to the regulators, people familiar with the matter tell fox business, commodities future trading commission is looking for new rules for high speed computer changes. sec chairman mary jo white plans to hold a meeting with marketing officials and nasdaq about the marketing freeze. they plan to have new standards and fines for electronic trading networks t would require them to test their systems and design plans for failures. house services and staff there are examining the issue. tracy? tracy: rich edson, thank you very much. adam: for more on yesterday's nasdaq flash freeze and what is means for investors, brian jacobsen, wells fargo fund management. he is the chief portfolio strategist and he joins us now. get back to the question of nasdaq. have they thoroughly explained this to the satisfaction of investors and market participants? >> stock price reaction would suggest they haven't thoroughly explained or people didn't
lot, your car scans for a spot, waits for the car to leave and then backs in. and the technology is getting there. it's not the first company in this game. gm, toyota, and audi are all developing so-called aon t so-called -- autonomous cars. a self driving car within seven years. it's not that crazy really. even today you can buy cars which parallel park themselves. nissan's autonomous car will be able to identify people, animals, other cars, even weirdly shaped cars like a weaner mobile. i have a bit of a love affair with cars and self driving technology. they can avoid some of the problems we haves like texting, drunkenness. that's it for tonight. thanks for joining us. on wednesday how one city is fighting hard not to go the way of detroit as it struggles to meet its pension obligations. i'm ali velshi. see you then on "real money." ♪ jazeera.com. >> i'm lisa fletcher and you're in the stream. should evolution be challenged in textbooks. it's the question asked in texas so what does it mean for the rest of the nation? >> forget don't mess with texas. members of the scientifi
. the cnbc news line is rick shearling, head of u.s. technology research. he just got off the phone with microsoft. rick, was ballmer forced out? >> jim, it's not exactly clear. you know that value act was pressing and threatening to file a proxy battle. and on their agenda was management succession. so i guess what's unclear right now does this validate that value active getting a board seat and they're already having some effect for might suggest that value act had a harder time winning a board seat, that one of their key items to appeal to investors was was management succession is kind of off the table now. the other items, i think on value act's agenda is the significant repurchase and significant increase in dividend. i think all of that becomes more likely if you have new management in place. but i think right now the key question would be does this probability of getting a board seat or wrath whether they have to go through the proxy concept and whether that's effective. one of their main octobbjective management succession. >> do you think that investors should chase the st
technology. but they're getting around that with the boats. tucson has wonderful technologies, but all it does is presses them to other points. and now the new point of entry now is texas. the rio grande valley, the immigration flow has 55%. without a national strategy and plan to dix state where we put those resources we're going to continue to throw money at the problem without a real solution. >> and your proposal, this administration, to be clear, has rolled back 287g, the co-op prative legislation that authorized regulation, that authorizes cooperation between the immigration authorities, the border patrol, and local law enforcement. this administration wants no part of it. your law, your bill, would encourage that cooperation. what has been the reaction? >> local law enforcement are force multiplier. the ones down the border have a valuable role to play. the border sheriffs endorse my bill, they support it, because it gives -- this bill gives them a voice as stakeholders as to what the national strategy is going to be and what the implementation plan is going to be along with the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 369 (some duplicates have been removed)